Thu. Jul 18th, 2024
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TasteAtlas food rankings are based on the ratings of the TasteAtlas audience, with a series of mechanisms that recognize real users and that ignore bot, nationalist or local patriotic ratings, and give additional value to the ratings of users that the system recognizes as knowledgeable. For the “10 Worst Rated Austrian Dishes” list until March 14, 2023, 3,439 ratings were recorded, of which 2,750 were recognized by the system as legitimate. TasteAtlas Rankings should not be seen as the final global conclusion about food. Their purpose is to promote excellent local foods, instill pride in traditional dishes, and arouse curiosity about dishes you haven’t tried

Zwetschgenknödel

Zwetschgenknödel

Zwetschgenknödel is a traditional Austrian dessert consisting of dumplings that are stuffed with plums (usually of the sweet damson variety). The dumplings are typically made with boiled and mashed potatoes, flour, egg yolks, ground semolina wheat, butter, and salt.

Slices of potato dough are used to enclose whole pitted plums which have been previously filled with sugar or sugar cubes. Once stuffed, they are rolled into smooth balls and simmered in water until they float up to the surface. The boiled dumplings are finally rolled in buttered and browned breadcrumbs, then enjoyed warm, typically dusted with powdered sugar.

Punschkrapfen

Punschkrapfen

Hiding underneath the adorable pink fondant are cubes made from two rum-soaked biscuit sponges that have been layered with a combination of nougat and jam. Once assembled, they are typically drizzled with chocolate or topped with a cocktail cherry.

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Punschkrapfen or punch cakes have been enjoyed for centuries in Austria, and although the origins of the cake are still a subject of debate, some believe that they can be traced all the way back to the Middle Ages. Today, these iconic Viennese cakes come in many shapes and sizes and are sold in pastry shops and bakeries throughout Austria.

Speckknödel

Speckknödel

These bacon dumplings originate from the Austrian Tyrol and Italian South Tyrol but are known throughout the entire Alpine region of Europe. Speckknödeln are made by mixing stale bread with eggs, sauteed bacon, and onions. They are cooked in boiling water and typically served with a hearty stew or a clear, hot soup, although they are also often consumed as an appetizer.

Speckknödeln make a great accompaniment to the Alpine dish called Gröstl, but they’re also served on a bed of lettuce or over sauerkraut.

Fiakergulasch

Fiakergulasch

Fiakergulasch is a popular variation on the traditional Viennese goulash, or Wiener saftgulasch, as it is known in Austria. The dish is usually made with diced beef that is simmered in a flavorful sauce consisting of onions, tomato purée, garlic, water, vinegar, smoked paprika (hot and mild or sweet), bay leaves, marjoram, caraway seeds, salt, and pepper.

What distinguishes this version from other Viennese goulash versions is the choice of garnishes and accompaniments that are traditionally served with the beef stew. These include fried Wiener sausages (known as Frankfurter würstel in Austria), fan-cut pickled gherkins, bread dumplings or boiled potatoes, and a fried, sunny-side-up egg.

Bosna

Bosna

Bosna is an Austrian sandwich originating from Salzburg. It consists of an elongated white bread bun that’s filled with a bratwurst sausage, onions, parsley, ketchup, mustard, and curry powder. Bosna with one sausage is called Kleine Bosna, while the version with two sausages is known as Große Bosna.

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It is believed that the sandwich was invented in 1949 by a Bulgarian named Zanko Todoroff. This sandwich can be easily found at many street vendors in Austria.

Krautfleckerl

Krautfleckerl

Krautfleckerl is an Austrian pasta dish with Bohemian (Czech Republic) origins that has handmade pasta squares fleckerl and white cabbage as main ingredients. The preparation starts with sauteeing onions, cabbage, and sugar until caramelized, which are then seasoned with caraway seeds, pepper, and salt, and mixed with cooked pasta.

Optionally, broth, vinegar, or water can also be added, so the cabbage doesn’t dry out. The dish is present in most of the Central European countries, such as Hungary, Germany, Poland, and Croatia. Still, the dish varies from country to country and can include additional ingredients such as bacon, parsley, and garlic or leave some ingredients out.

Faschierte Laibchen

Faschierte Laibchen

A typical specialty of Austrian cuisine, faschierte laibchen (lit. ground meat patty), is made with a combination of ground meat (typically a mixture of ground beef and ground pork), milk-soaked bread, eggs, fried onions, fried garlic, spices, and seasonings.

The ground meat mixture is often flavored with parsley, salt, pepper, and a handful of spices such as marjoram, thyme, caraway, and nutmeg. Some versions call for spicing up the patties by adding other ingredients such as mustard, lemon or orange zest, or paprika to the combination.

Reindling

Reindling

Reindling is a type of cake originating from Carinthia that is intended to be sweet, but in some instances, it can be prepared as a savory bread. The yeasted dough is typically flavored with ingredients such as raisins, cinnamon, and various ground nuts.

When the cake is served, it is often paired with butter and jam. Reindling is also traditionally served during celebratory events such as baptisms, weddings, and during the Easter festivities.

Speckknödelsuppe

Speckknödelsuppe

Speckknödelsuppe is a soup from the Austrian province of Tyrol. It’s also popular in the Italian South Tyrol region, where it’s called canederli con speck in brodo. The soup features dumplings made from stale bread and bacon, and a clear, (usually beef) broth that is cooked separately.

The dumplings are first cooked, then added to the soup which can contain additional ingredients such as carrots and leeks. When ready to serve, this dumpling soup is usually garnished with chopped chives or parsley.

Beuschel

Beuschel

Beuschel is one of the classics of Austrian cuisine. Often compared to a ragout, this hearty dish is made with offal, usually heart and lungs, and it is served in a delicious, dark brown sauce. Usually, calf offal is used in the dish, but other animals or organs can also be utilized.

Due to the consistency of the offal, beuschel is a time-consuming dish found only in traditional and notable Austrian restaurants. Even though it can be found in all parts of Austria, it is usually associated with Vienna and represents a real example of the old Viennese cuisine.

Source: https://www.tasteatlas.com/

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By Lala